Seaside and the Reinterpretation of the Wood Frame Vernacular House

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The town of Seaside, located on the Florida panhandle, is widely acknowledged as a significant work of town planning. Designed according to the principles of the New Urbanism, it is an influential exemplar of urban planning.

However, Seaside is also an important laboratory of building design. It’s particularly known for its house designs which reinterpret the southern wood frame vernacular.

For those of us interested in studying these houses there’s a great website available, The Seaside Research Portal, a collaboration between the University of Notre Dames’ Hesburgh Libraries and School of Architecture. The Portal is an archive of photos and drawings of Seaside buildings, and information about the architects.

Some of the entries document all phases of the design process, from preliminary sketches to construction drawings and presentation models.

The following are a few examples from the Portal – of Seaside houses which reinterpret the wood frame vernacular dwellings found along the coastal South.

 

Giant’s Roost (Architect: Deborah Berke)

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Rainbow House (Architect: Deborah Berke)

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Shady Lady (Architect: Deborah Berke)

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Blakey Residence (Architect: Braulio Casas)

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Latitude (Architects:  Samuel Mockbee & Coleman Coker)

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Sources Cited:

The Seaside Research Portal http://seaside.library.nd.edu/

 

© Donald E. Armstrong and Material Practices, 2013

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