Architectural Sketching: Rome, Italy

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rome-sketchbook

In 2002 I had the good fortune to return to Italy, this time to visit Rome. A school sponsored trip, I brought several students from Tuskegee University’s Department of Architecture with me.

Sketching played a larger role than on previous trips.

We arrived at our hotel in the center of Rome, and I made sure each student grabbed their luggage from the taxi. After riding the cage elevator up to the hotel lobby, I double-checked – all luggage accounted for!

Except for one piece – my camera bag.

My road-worn camera bag, which had accompanied me on trips across the US, Mexico and parts of Europe, remained on the back seat of the taxi. In addition to my 35mm SLR camera and lens were my sketchbooks and pens. Finding the taxi, now swallowed up in the Roman night, was a lost cause.

The next morning I bought a cheap point-and-shoot camera, an Italian composition book, a pad of vellum and some pens.

Knowing that at best I would go home with a bunch of grainy photographs, sketching became a more important way of documenting my experiences.

The following are a few of the sketches I made on this journey, which included a day-trip to the archaeological site Ostia Antica.

 

 Fig. 1: The Pantheon, Rome, Italy, 2002


Fig. 1: The Pantheon, Rome, Italy, 2002

 

 Fig. 2: The Pantheon (analytical sketch), Rome, Italy, 2002


Fig. 2: The Pantheon (analytical sketch), Rome, Italy, 2002

 

 Fig. 3: The Pantheon (analytical sketch), Rome, Italy, 2002


Fig. 3: The Pantheon (analytical sketch), Rome, Italy, 2002

 

 Fig. 4: Piazza Navona, Rome, Italy, 2002


Fig. 4: Piazza Navona, Rome, Italy, 2002

 

 Fig. 5: Courtyard, Rome, Italy, 2002


Fig. 5: Courtyard, Rome, Italy, 2002

 

ostia-antica


Fig. 6: Ostia Antica, Italy, 2002

 

© Donald E. Armstrong and Material Practices, 2013

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